Beauty and the Beast (2017) Film Review

3/5 stars

Unless you’ve also been trapped in Beast’s castle then you’ll know that Disney are hard at work by revisiting their animated classics in live action format. This can be traced back to the billion dollar grossing Alice in Wonderland (2010) which was followed by Maleficent in 2014. Not crediting Cinderella (2015) completely to Disney’s now traditional approach to revisiting its animated classics, however since then we’ve seen Disney take less risks with remaking its animations.

Ever since the beginning of 2015 when Emma Watson was cast as Belle in the live action Beauty and the Beast, the hype has been high and audiences have been eagerly awaiting Disney’s new interpretation of it’s 1991 classic. For years I’ve been looking forward to this film, but months before once all of the promotional material was being released I had this sense that it wouldn’t be the grand and extravagant remake I was hoping for…sadly I was right.

TALE AS OLD AS TIME

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Starting with the positives I thought the film looked the part. Visually it was eye catching and I thought they captured the look and vibe of the original quite well. The characters of Lumière, Cogsworth, Mrs. Potts, Chip etc. were all effortlessly integrated with the live action characters (something I felt that The Jungle Book – 2016 failed to do with its CGI animals and live action characters) and I thought those characters were fun to watch and it wasn’t a huge let down from the animated versions of these characters.

With $462 million worldwide (against a $160 million budget) at the Box Office (so far) and with a 70% rating on Rotten Tomatoes, fans are clearly loving this film (for some reason). It is a tale that is as old as time (1991 feels like a century ago to most people) and since the animation’s release it has always been a part of people’s childhoods and it has grown up with people still retaining it’s relevant and popular appeal. My worry is that now Disney see that being unoriginal and not taking chances works, they’ll rehash it’s upcoming live action adaptations. I guess from a business point of view fair enough but where are the visionaries that want to do something exciting and new meaning that it can stand side by side with the originals and now replace them.

GASTON THE MOVIE: FEAUTRING BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

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If I had to single one performance out as the most committed and most convincing it was Luke Evans as Gaston. He played the arrogant bachelor to perfection, down to his singing and characterisation it was flawless. Out of all the cast I felt Luke Evans was the only one who gave 100% and the scenes with him in were more exciting than others…and that’s saying something when you’re meant to be watching the film for the leading performances of Belle and Beast.

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Speaking of the cast; Emma Watson is a great actress (she was amazing in Perks of being a Wallflower -2012 and The Bling Ring – 2013) and on paper she IS Belle. However, there were moments (especially the first half or so) where her performance felt half hearted. I know she’s singing about how everyone are peasants and she’s superior to everyone but even the animated Belle seemed more kind to the locals and in general the animated Belle was more fun to watch. It was rise and fall with Emma’s performance; the iconic ballroom scene and when she goes back to her provincial town to rescue her father were the highlights of her performance. She wasn’t bad but I expected more from her (no offence but after watching her performance as Belle I’m happy she dropped out of La La Land – 2016 for Oscar winner Emma Stone to replace her). I would say Dan Stevens as the Beast was slightly better with his performance, but I would argue that the animation team who worked on his look did an amazing job of effortlessly blending his character with the live action characters. Overall, not exactly the most exciting leading couple that have graced our screens.

TAKE CHANCES

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I will be that person that says that the animation is far more superior than the 2017 live action remake. The original is more atmospheric, dramatic, emotional, heartwarming and grand in everything from its characters to the look of the film. In 1992 Beauty and the Beast became the first animation to be nominated an Oscar for Best Picture, I seriously doubt this new version will have anywhere near that same impact today. This is why it should have done differently so that it honours the original but offers something new to today’s audience. Scenes like when Belle runs on the hill and sings, Beast offering Belle the library, even the iconic ballroom dance scene etc. were adapted half heartedly and it almost felt like they were just there because the audience were expecting them to feature in the film. The animation did all of those scenes and more with a sense of grandeur and wonder. The danger rehashing everything from the animation is the audience knows what to expect so there’s no sense of mystery and wonder.

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I understand that director Bill Condon was unapologetic about honouring the 1991 animation with only the addition of a few new songs (which added nothing new to the film) and Emma Watson’s few tweaks (which were hardly revolutionary to the character) however I would have loved it if Disney took a risk and brought something new to the table. The reason why Alice in Wonderland (2010) and Maleficent (2014) worked so well, in my opinion, was because they took a new approach to a tale that in embedded in our brains from childhood. I have no issues with remakes, only if they offer something unique and something that is worth watching again in a different format. I would have loved to see Guillermo del Toro’s version as he definitely would have bright a refreshing take of a tale so universally known and loved. Sadly he departed from the project a few years ago making way for Bill Condon to direct his unoriginal remake.

I’ve heard about a live action update for several years and I thought the decision to approach the remake in a more traditional manner was more down to the the success of Cinderella (2015) however I read that Bill Condon decided to take less chances after the success of Frozen (2013):

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“Before I arrived, they were rethinking Beauty and the Beast more radically, more like Snow White and the Huntsman. There was a lot of conversation about the War of the Austrian Succession that didn’t interest me. But then after Frozen opened, the studio saw that there was this big international audience for an old-school-musical approach. But initially they said, “We’re interested in a musical to a degree, but only half full of songs.” My interest was taking that film and doing it in this new medium — live action — as a full-on musical movie. So I backed out for a minute, and they came back and said, “No, no, no, we get it, let’s pursue it that way.” 

Even without Guillermo del Toro we could have seen a more radical and exciting version of Beauty and the Beast, because the story is far bigger than Disney itself so why not try something new?

I’ve expressed my fears for what impact the success of this film may have, however overall I would say it’s a enjoyable film which is easy and fun to watch. But it’s worrying that 26 years later Disney we’re basically seeing Disney revisit their greatest hits in the most unoriginal way possible. My advice is watch this film so you can tick it off your list, it’s not a total waste of your time, but please watch the original animation as it’s far more impactful than the 2017 version.

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Once Upon A Time

It’s safe to say I am a Disney enthusiast, they are timeless classics that appeal to all ages. But how do people feel about Walt Disney Studios revamping these classics into a live action film? Personally I think it’s a great idea to retell these stories for a modern day audience. However I can see from both sides of the coin.

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It could be argued that in 2010 the “Fairy-Tale Adaptation” began with Tim Burton’s billion dollar grossing film Alice in Wonderland. The film was a huge box office hit and the sequel is already being filmed for a release date of 2016, entitled Alice in Wonderland: Through the Looking Glass. Whilst the film was met with mixed reviews, it did receive praise for visual style and special effects. This resulted in Academy Award wins for Best Art Direction and Best Costume.

What made this adaptation unique was how it strayed from the traditional take of the Lewis Carol tale, as envisioned in the 1951 animation. Alice would become a warrior in Burton’s adaptation, and it would shake things up for a 21st Century audience. This is why I respect this version and I am excited to see what the followup will entail.

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Fast forward to 2014 and Disney releases their twist on their classic animation Sleeping Beauty, with the Angelina Jolie fronted Maleficent. Interestingly enough, people were worried the film would flop because of its darker take on the tale. This film was a risk for Disney, a risk that paid off in full. Maleficent grossed over $758 million at the worldwide box office, which marks Jolie’s biggest commercial hit of her career and became the fourth highest grossing film of 2014. Whilst it was far from perfect, Jolie totally owned her character and allowed the tale to be seen from a different point of view.

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Following the success of Maleficent, Cinderella was released in March 2015 and so far has earned more than $340 million at the worldwide box office (and still counting). Interestingly enough, the Kenneth Branagh version has been met with critical praise, for Alice in Wonderland and Maleficent received mixed reviews. Whilst the latter two films mentioned were box office hits, critics were keen to point out that Cinderella remained faithful to the original and yet managed to update it for a modern day audience.

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Regardless of it’s critical reception, Disney have obviously tapped into a growing market and have already started planning adaptations of their animations. In March 2017 they will release Beauty and the Beast, starring Emma Watson and Dan Stevens. Disney have recently announced their plans to release a live action version of Mulan (release date TBC). Two versions of The Jungle Book are being released (Disney version being released in 2015 and Warner Brother version being released in 2016) and Winnie the Pooh has been given the green light for a live action make over.

On the other hand, I do see the other point of view where Disney could be accused of lacking originality. People have grown up with these animations, including myself, and have their own connection to them and fear these adaptations may taint them. The great thing about the live action adaptations is that it gives directors creative freedom to go deeper into what the animations explored, without disowning what came before.

Straying away from fairytales, a quote from Jurassic Park is appropriate for this post: “Yeah, yeah, but your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could that they didn’t stop to think if they should.” Is this true for adapting animations into live action feature films? Whatever the answer is, it seems to be working. Personally, I welcome someone to share a new take on a well known tale.

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I loved how even with Universal’s Snow White and the Huntsman, they created a new version for a well known story. I loved Jolie’s take on a classic villain and I’m interested to see what the sequel to Alice in Wonderland (having a 6 year gap in-between both films) has in store. I love Disney animations, but I’m just as excited to see these universally known classics adapted for a modern day audience.